The Angry Red Planet: A 1959 Sci-Fi Classic

A look at the 1959 Sci-Fi Classic “The Angry Red Planet” and its place in the history of Science Fiction cinema.

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Introduction

The Angry Red Planet is a 1959 American science fiction film directed by Ib Melchior and starring Gerald Mohr, Nora Hayden, and Les Tremayne. The screenplay by Cahill and Joseph Fraley was based on an uncredited story by Melchior. The film was released by American International Pictures as a second-feature in February 1959.

During a manned mission to Mars in 2054, the spacecraft Emerald crashes onto the surface. The sole survivor is mission commander Colonel Gerard Gurney (Gerald Mohr), who is severely injured. When he awakens in a hospital back on Earth, he is told that he is the only one who made it back alive from the crash.

Gurney slowly begins to remember what happened during the ill-fated mission and starts to have nightmares about it. He becomes fixated on Mars, and even starts to believe that he is still there. With the help of his girlfriend, Dr. Molly Woods (Nora Hayden), Gurney tries to piece together what happened during the mission and why he is the only one who made it back alive.

The Angry Red Planet is considered to be one of the earliest examples of color schlock filmmaking, with its low budget special effects and reliance on gore to generate scares. The film’s use of color tinting, superimposed images, and animation effects have been cited as precursors to modern found footage films such as The Blair Witch Project (1999).

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The Movie

The Angry Red Planet is a 1959 American science fiction film directed by Ib Melchior and starring Gerald Mohr, Nora Hayden, andLes Tremayne. The screenplay was adapted from Melchior’s story by John L. Balderston and William Ritchie. The film was produced by George Pal and released by Paramount Pictures.

The Plot

The Angry Red Planet is a 1959 American science fiction film directed by Ib Melchior. The film was distributed by Metropolitan Productions, and produced by Aubrey Wisberg, who also wrote the screenplay with Jack Pollexfen. Its cast includes Gerald Mohr, Nora Hayden, Les Tremayne and Jack Kosslyn. The production was notable for the innovative use of Technicolor’s ‘Cinemascope’ widescreen colour process, low-budget special effects work by Louis DeWitt and for being the first feature film to be edited entirely in pan and scan.

The plot follows the first manned mission to Mars, which is launched from Earth in 2073. Upon arrival, the four astronauts find the planet apparently uninhabited by intelligent life. They soon discover that it is inhabited by hostile plant and animal lifeforms that are impervious to their weapons. With no hope of rescue or escape, they are forced to battle their way back to their spacecraft while avoiding being killed or infected by the hostile Martian environment.

The Cast

The Angry Red Planet is a 1959 American science fiction film directed by Ib Melchior. The film stars Gerald Mohr, Nora Hayden, and Leslie Nielsen.

The story follows spacemen who crash-land on Mars and find the planet inhabited by giant spiders and other strange creatures. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Special Effects.

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The cast of The Angry Red Planet includes:

-Gerald Mohr as Commander Robert O’Bannon
-Nora Hayden as Dr. Iris Ryan
-Leslie Nielsen as Lt. Commander John Carter

The Special Effects

The Angry Red Planet is a 1959 sci-fi classic that is known for its innovative and groundbreaking special effects. The film’s visual effects were created by the legendaryRay Harryhausen, who used a technique called “stop-motion photography” to bring the Martian creatures to life. This technique involved photographing puppets or models one frame at a time, then moving them very slightly for the next frame. When the frames were played back in sequence, it created the illusion of movement.

The special effects in The Angry Red Planet are some of the most iconic and memorable in all of science fiction film history. They were truly ahead of their time, and helped to set the standard for all future sci-fi movies.

The Legacy

The Angry Red Planet is a 1959 American science fiction film directed by Ib Melchior. It was released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. The film was written by Melchior, Curt Siodmak, and Raymond F. Jones. It is based on the novel by Jones, who also wrote the screenplay. The film stars Gerald Mohr, NESApatricia Laffan, and Les Tremayne.

The Impact

The Angry Red Planet is a 1959 American science fiction film directed by Ib Melchior. The film was produced independently, and Melchior both wrote the screenplay and directed the film. It starred Gerald Mohr, Nora Hayden, and Les Tremayne. The Bryan Foy Orchestra provided musical backing, conducted by Hans J. Salter.

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The film is notable for its use of color in the exterior scenes, as they are tinted in a duotone green-and-red scheme; this was done to save money on expensive Technicolor equipment that would otherwise be needed. The feature was also one of the first to be shot in CinemaScope, albeit an optical reduction print rather than true anamorphic widescreen.

Despite its low budget and occasionally poor acting, The Angry Red Planet is significant as one of the earliest serious science fiction films to tackle the subject of extraterrestrial life, and its exploration of Mars as a plausible setting for that life. It has been described as “a precursor to later scientifically-oriented Martian epics such as Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1964) and Total Recall (1990)”.

The Criticism

The movie was not well reviewed when it first came out and was generally panned by critics. However, it has since gained a cult following and is now considered a classic of the sci-fi genre.

Conclusion

The Angry Red Planet is a fun, entertaining movie that delivers on its promises of thrills and chills. Although it may not be the most sophisticated or original film in the genre, it is a well-made example of 1950s science fiction and is worth watching for fans of the genre.

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